Thursday, June 4, 2009

The Phenomenon called 'Porn Creep'

'Porn Creep' is a term used in the media industry to describe the intentional infusion of pornography into mainstream culture. Time Magazine online recently featured an article by Belinda Luscombe discussing this phenomenon.

Referring to a recent Bud Light ad featuring a man buying a pornographic magazine, Luscombe writes , "the ad, which quietly appeared in February as part of a viral campaign, has attracted little notice so far, but because it comes from a highly-respected American brand, it seems to mark some kind of cultural tipping point, where pornography has soaked so far into the fabric of mainstream culture that it's no longer seen as a stain."

For example, a recent Quiznos' commercial, called 2 Girls and Sub, features two playboy models feasting on a sub sandwich in a blatantly sexual way (an online article actually provided a link where the commercial could be viewed on Playboy's website--for obvious reasons I choose not to provide that link here). Secular critics have also accused the company of homoerotic subtext in its "Toasty Torpedo" commercials. Print ads for companies like American Apparel feature full nudity as well as bisexual and homosexual images. Carl Jr, a West-coast fast-food chain, is also notorious for hypersexualized commercials. Budweiser has just released a television ad portraying a man buying beer and a pornographic magazine. In the ad, unwanted (but clearly intended to be humorous) attention is draw to the man's pornography and the commercial includes crude pornographic language and images of sexual 'toys'.

What is interesting about this phenomenon is how mainstream media itself is taking notice--and some are even voicing softly-spoken concerns. Donna Rice Hughes, an anti-pornography advocate states, "The line has gotten really blurred. There's a whole generation that has been pornified. They don't think it's a big deal."

For Christian families and individuals the increasing pornographic content of mainstream media is troubling. The issue here isn't a Christian's desire to force Christian morals upon society, but rather of having pornographic values forced upon Christians (as well as society as a whole). It is one thing for a pornographic image to be regulated to a special room at a video rental store--it is another thing entirely for that pornography to appear in a commerical during an episode of American Funniest Home Videos. The first allows access to anyone who wishes to indulge, the second forces the content upon all regardless of age or willingness. Quite literally, there are few safe havens for Evangelical Christian families wishing to steer clear of the influences of "porn creep".

Father, Thy kingdom come...and in the present time protect my family's eyes from evil.


JG

1 comment:

  1. Hi Josh,

    I agree that this is very disturbing. But to be honest I think we've been seeing it coming for quite some time now. The amount of blasphemy in movies and tv is on the rise to such an extent that one has to go to the Disney channel to even feel remotely safe. Even then, we are confronted with at best a nominal approach to life where dishonesty is portrayed as an acceptable practice for young people.

    Adverts hoever, are probably the most sinister. We aren't there for the adverts, we are not told what adverts we will see and are therefore usually unaware as to what we are going to be hit with next. They really are the devil's playground.

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