Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Biblical Certainty

I was reading another blog on the subject of biblical certainty.  The writer was responding to that movement which questions the possibility that we can know with confidence the truths of Scripture. The logic goes as follows:
a) God is infinite
b) We are finite
c) The finite can never grasp the infinite
d) Therefore, we can never understand anything about God.
Sometimes we hear this same logic presented in a different way:
a) There are many different interpretations of any given scripture passage
b) We are finite, and therefore can never have God's understanding of truth
c) Therefore, no one can ever understand Scripture with certainty.
The way we respond to this is important.  No Christian should ever claim we can know everything about God with absolute certainty.  Neither should we even claim we can understand every verse in the Bible with absolute certainty.  But the biblical position is that we can know God and accurately understand the central teachings of His Word. While there may be some legitimate interpretational questions on various biblical texts, to deny that we can know the essentials of the Christian faith is a denial of revelation and of God's power and ability to successfully communicate with humanity.

I'm not going to get into a technical philosophical response (we can save that for a later date).  As I read the blog I came across one of the comments.  Written tongue-in-cheek, the comment applies the logic above to our treatment of women:
There are numerous ways people choose to treat women. Some love them, some rape them, some beat them, some murder them to save the family honor and so on. So I guess the reality of multiple views means that we cannot know the proper or correct interpretation or understanding.  Whew! I thought I was going to have to make a moral choice or something.  I stand relieved.
Well said!

1 comment:

  1. "to deny that we can know the essentials of the Christian faith is a denial of revelation and of God's power and ability to successfully communicate with humanity."

    When I think about it, I kinda think that the promoters of epistemic uncertainty are insulting God and His ability to communicate to us.

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